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Stay Active: Injury Prevention with TJ Bellama

Many of you may have noticed the new guy hanging around the gym for the last month – that’s TJ. He’s a physical therapist who specializes in working to prevent injuries before they even happen, and we’ve brought him on board to work with all of you.

Fix any issues: stay healthy for the Open

Maybe your shoulder bothers you when you do push press, or you feel like you shift around a lot when doing cleans. Maybe you have a hard time keeping your knees out on squats, or you’ve just plateaued and want to figure out how to keep improving. Maybe you want to make sure you’re ready for the Open and keep yourself going through all 5 workouts.

TJ can help you figure out what’s going on if something’s bothering you, and how to keep it from becoming more serious. He can also help you improve your movements to avoid those nagging problems in the first place. In other words, everyone can benefit from a session.

We’ll be releasing a couple posts about common injuries and how to address them. Our goal is to always help you get into better shape, but to also keep you injury-free.

Talk to any of the coaches if you’d like more information, or to TJ himself whenever he’s at the gym. Feel free to contact TJ directly at thomas.bellama@hotmail.com, and you can also schedule an appointment through www.12labourscrossfit.com.

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  • heather overhead fix.png

Overhead stability and Movement Correction

BEFORE: This catch position puts tremendous stress at the knees, ankles, and spine. It also makes it more difficult to control, limiting how much she can lift.

AFTER: TJ figured out that her shoulder muscles were not firing correctly, which was severally impacting Heather's lift. He taught her how use the muscles around her shoulder blades to better support the weight overhead, which allowed her to push her hips back and better absorb the weight with her whole body.

Notice that the first image shows Heathers knees driving over her toes and she's in a higher receiving position. The second image demonstrates how the adjustment enabled her to shift her weight back and receive the bar in a lower, more stable position.